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THE TATTLER 



WILLIAMSBURG, MASSACHUSETTS 



1947 




(Jlflrs. Jfrauces Qirtmtell 



To Mrs. Grinnell, our teacher, 
advisor, and friend we gratefully 
dedicate this issue of the Tattler. 





HELEN JAMES SCHOOL 



THE TATTLER 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Editor-in-Chief Shirley Payne 

Assistant Editor Barbara Dymerski 

Business Manager Russell Warner 

Assistants Marilyn Williams, Robert Collins 

Literary Editor Floyd Merritt 

Assistant Robert Smith 

Alumni Editor Palma Ingellis 

Assistant Esther Loomis 

Sports Editor Edward McColgan 

Exchange Editor Laura Lloyd 

Faculty Advisor Mr. Hill 



CONTENTS 


Dedication ... 3 


School Picture 




- 








4 


Senior Class Pictures 












6 


Faculty Pictures 












10 


Class Day Program 












11 


Class Prophecy 












12 


Prophecy On The Prophet 












13 


Class Will .... 












14 


Class History 












15 


Song and Movie Hits 












16 


Class Grinds 












17 


Class Statistics . 












18 


Seniorscope 












19 


Class of '48 












20 


Class of '49 












21 


Class of '50 












22 


Editorials 












23 


Class Trip to New York 












24 


Literary 












26 


Tattler . 












30 


Review Staff 












31 


Forensic League 












32 


Pro Merito 












33 


Basketball 












34 


Cheer Leaders 












35 


Baseball 












36 


Glee Clubs 












37 


School Play 












38 


Junior Prom 












39 


Informals 












40 


Alumni Notes 












41 


Autographs 












42 


Advertisements 












43 



W I L L I A M S B I! R G HI G II SCHOOL 







FLORENCE MARCIA BEALS "Flossie" 

"A generous soul is sunshine to the mind." 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Girls' Glee Club 4; Class Play 4; 
Prom Committee .'?; Amateur Show 4. 

Farmerette Musical Big- hearted 



ELIZABETH ANN BROOKS "Liz" 

"A merry heart is a purse well lined." 
Vice President 2, 3; Revue Staff 2, 3, 4; Prom Com- 
mittee 3; Dramatic Club 2; Girls' Glee Club 4; Class 
Play 4. 

Entertaining Amiable Bashful 



DOROTHY ADELINE CARVER "Pete" 

"Good humored, frank and free." 
Class Historian 3, 4; Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Pro Merito 3, 4; 
Revue Staff 3; Dramatic Club 2; Prom Committee 3; 
Class Play 4; Amateur Show 4. 

Dainty Artistic Critical 



FRANK BRADLEY COLLINS "Dresz" 

"Ne'er a thought can we express, 
Without a bit of wit from Dresz" 
Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Dramatic Club 2; Student Model Con- 
gress, Northampton 3; Student Model Congress, A.I.C. 
3; Student Government Convention 4; Class Play 4; 
Revue Staff 3, 4; Tattler Staff 4; Prom Committee 3; 
Amateur Show 4. 

Forever joking Blithesome Comical 



*.' 



THE TATTLER 



BARBARA ANN DYMERSKI "Barb" 

"Gay like a warm summer day 
until — a spark brews a storm." 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Girls' Glee Club 4; Class President 

3; Vice President 4; Tattler Staff 4; Revue Staff 3, 4; 

Prom Committee 3; Class Play 4; Pro Merito 3, 4; 

Amateur Show 4. 

Bright Ambitious Daring 



DORIS LOUISE GRAVES 

"Charms strike the sight but merit wins the soul." 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4 Class President 1, 2; Forensic 
League 2, 3, 4; Declamations 2, 3; Girls' State 3; Pro 
Merito 3, 4; State Declamation Contest 3; Orchestra 
1, 2; Amateur Show 4; Model Congress at Northamp- 
ton 3; Pro Merito Convention 3; Tattler Staff 3; Revue 
Staff 4; N. E. Junior Model Congress at A.I.C. 4; 
Class Play Committee 4; Prom Committee 3. 
Dressy Likeable Gay 



THEODORA HOWES HARLOW "Honey" 

"A live wire is never stepped on." 
Cheerleader 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Girls' Glee Club 
4; Class Play Committee 4; Dramatic Club 3; Revue 
Staff 2, 3; Prom Committee 3; Prom Queen 3; Student 
Council 1; Amateur Show 4. 

Talkative Humorous Harmless 



JANET MAE HILLENBRAND "Bubbles" 

"She sighed for many but loved just one." 
Glee Club 4; Cheerleading 3, 4; Prom Committee 3; 
Class Play Committee 4; Victory Corps 1, 2. 
Jealous Mischievous Hilarious 




WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 








HARRIETT INEZ ICE "Hattio" 

"Ever cheerful, ever smiling, never known to frown." 

Glee Club 1, 2, 4; Prom Committee 3; Girls' Glee 
Club 4; Senior Class Play Committee 4; Revue Staff 3. 

Happy Invaluable Innocent 



DAVID WALLACE LEDUC "Duker" 

"Of carefree spirit, light in heart." 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Play 4; Prom Committee 3. 
Debonair Wolfish Liked 



FLOYD SAMUEL MERRITT "Twink" 

"Preparation is the keynote of success." 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4; Pro Merito 
3, 4; Boys' State 3; Debating 3, 4; Declamations 2, 3, 4; 
Class President 4; Pro Merito Convention 3; A.I.C. 
Congress 3; Oratorical Contest 4; Essay Contest 3, 4; 
Editor of Revue 3; Student Council Convention 4; 
Tattler Staff 3, 4; State Debate Tournament 3; Senior 
Class Play 4; Model Congress at Northampton 3; Model 
Congress at Chicopee 4; Prom Committee 3. 
"Flash" Scholar Modest 



ROWENA ISABELLE NYE "Ketzel" 

"Tough but oh so gentle." 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Cheerleader 3, 4; Prom Committer 
3; Class Play Committee 4; National Poetry Contest 3; 
Revue Staff 4; Victory Corps 1, 2. 

Romantic Irish Nice 



THE TATTLER 




SHIRLEY LUCILLE PAYNE "Red" 

"She who has patience has everything." 
Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Revue Staff 3, 4; Tattler Staff 4; 
Class Play 4; Secretary of class 3, 4; Treasurer of 
class 3, 4; D.A.R. Pilgrim 4; Prom Committee 3; 
Amateur Show 4. 

Sure Luscious Practical 



ROBERT SCOTT SMITH "Smitty" 

"What care I when I can lie and rest; 
Kill time, and take life at its very best." 
Glee Club 1, 3, 4; Revue Staff 3; Prom Committee 3; 
Basketball 2, 3; Tattler Staff 4. 

Respectable Sturdy Sleepy 




The Faculty 




Mr. Edward Foster 




Mr. Raymond Hill 




Miss Anne Dunphy 




Mrs. Frances Grinnel] 



Miss Helena Webber 



THE TATTLER 



11 



SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 

PRESIDENT Floyd Merritt 

VICE-PRESIDENT Barbara Dymerski 

SECRETARY-TREASURER Shirley Payne 

CLASS HISTORIAN Dorothy Carver 

CLASS NIGHT 

ADDRESS OF WELCOME Floyd Merritt 

CLASS HISTORY Shirley Payne 

CLASS PROPHECY Frank Collins 

PROPHECY ON PROPHECY Robert Smith 

CLASS WILL Janet Hillenbrand 

CLASS GRINDS Rowena Nye 

GRADUATION NIGHT ORATORS 

Our Political Problems Doris Graves 

Our Economic Problems Dorothy Carver 

Our Social Problems Barbara Dymerski 

Our Problems of Peace Floyd Merritt 



CLASS MOTTO— Launched but not anchored 



COLORS— Maroon and Gold 



CLASS GIFT— Electric Clock for Auditorium 



CLASS FLOWER— Yellow Rose 



SENIOR CLASS 



FLORENCE BEALS 

ELIZABETH BROOKS 
*DOROTHY CARVER 

FRANK COLLINS 
^BARBARA DYMERSKI 
*DORIS GRAVES 

THEODORA HARLOW 
* Honor 



JANET HILLENBRAND 

HARRIETT ICE 

DAVID LEDUC 
—FLOYD MERRITT 

ROWENA NYE 

SHIRLEY PAYNE 

ROBERT SMITH 
**High Honor 



12 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Class Prophecy 



The time: Spring— 1968 

The place: Vicinity of New York 

The hot and sultry June afternoon was 
wearing away slowly but surely, and my 
old 1!»47 Chevrolet "jallopy" was as much 
under the weather as I was. The highway 
to New York was very easy to travel and 
I expected to arrive at the headquarters 
of the United Nations in an hour or so. 

The country was very prosperous now. 
Dewey was elected president twenty years 
ago in 1948, and he served two terms. 
Russia had had a civil war and the coun- 
try was now a peaceful republic. The United 
Nations built their headquarters in New 
York City around 1950 and the organization 
continued to grow thereafter. 

When I entered the office building to ob- 
tain some information from the public rec- 
ords. I saw a distinguished looking man 
with wavy, light grey hair, a rather keen 
smile, and a blazing red carnation in his 
lapel. I thought he looked a bit familiar 
and suddenly I recognized him. It was 
Floyd Merritt. It seems that Floyd was 
head of the reception department, and he 
said he was determined to work his way 
to the top. 

Just then the goodwill delegation from 
Italy arrived and Floyd and I gripped each 
other for support as we were introduced to 
the head of the delegation, Janet Hillen- 
brand. Janet had often traveled to Italy 
and now she was working for the United 
Nations, too. Floyd recovered from the sur- 
prise before I did and asked Janet what- 
ever had happened to Rowena Nye. We 
both figured Janet knew if anybody did, 
and sure enough she did. Rowena, too, 
had been successful. With the help of her 
millionaire husband, she now was owner 
of the country's largest chain of restau- 
rants, and business was very good. 

In the lobby I saw a small sign over a 
clerk's desk saying. "Honey's Interpreter 
Service." Having met two of my class- 
mates in just a few minutes, I began to 
think anything could happen, and it did. 
When I asked the clerk if there was a 
Theodora Harlow in her service, she ex- 



plained that there was but just now she 
was on a job in Russia. I remembered back 
in high school we used to wonder if and 
when "Honey" would ever wear out the 
English language. The clerk smiled a little 
at my curiosity and then she went on to 
tell me "Honey" was now master of seven 
languages. Only now did I notice the grin 
coming over the clerk's face. I forced a 
small smile and her grin exploded into, 
"Frank, what in the world are you doing 
here?" 

I was about ready to accept anything 
now because there, behind a desk no less, 
was Doris Graves. Sixteen years ago in 
1952 it seems that Doris married a Colonel 
of the United States Air Force. He was 
soon sent to Siberia on a two-year test 
project and so Doris took this job. But the 
colonel took a liking to Siberia, so they both 
have stayed at the same jobs ever since. 
Apparently, Doris had already met Floyd 
and Janet, but she asked me if I knew what 
Barbara Dymerski was doing now. I said 
I had no idea whatsoever, so she told me. 
Barbara had done very well, too, for she 
was now a singer in the most expensive 
night club in town — Capetown, South 
Africa. We always thought Barbara would 
g:o places. 

That night. Doris and I looked up Janet 
and Floyd and we went out looking for a 
good place to eat. We were walking down 
Broadway when I heard by high school nick- 
name "Dreszel" thunder out of a side street. 
There, climbing down a lamp post with a 
golf-club in one hand was Bob Smith. But 
Bob was quick to explain that this was 
as close to a night-club as he could get. So 
I loaned him three dollars and asked him 
to come along. We all wanted to know what 
happened to Bob and he quickly told us. 
After high school graduation he joined the 
Merchant Marine, and a short while later 
he missed his ship leaving Honk-Kong. 
After four years in China, Bob finally 
got a ship to California where he settled 
down and now has a national monoply on 
the stuffed-olive industry. 

"But what are you doing in New York?" 
I asked. 



THE TATTLER 



13 



Smitty paused a bit, then said he came 
East to look up his uncle in the New York 
Fire Department. 

We saw a large sign over a restaurant 
which read "Dave's Auto-Mat." Suddenly 
a big, black Packard pulled up at the curb 
and a dapper, well dressed gentleman 
stepped out and almost knocked me down 
as he dashed into the restaurant. Doris 
recognized him, and we rushed in. David 
LeDuc, it turned out, now owned the largest 
farm in Wisconsin, which supplied his chain 
of Auto-mats in New York. Then Dave told 
us that Florence Beals and Harriett Ice were 
managers of two of them. Dave said he 
wanted his help to know a little about farms 
as well as restaurants. 

The next morning I visited the Radio City 
Music Hall and at the ticket window I saw 
Dorothy Carver busily selling tickets. I 
bought mine and agreed to see her later 
when she wasn't so busy. She told me then 
that she had worked for seventeen years as 
a night scrub-woman in the music hall 
and then she was promoted to her present 
job. Dorothy said she had already written 
two novels and was also engaged to a 
retired banker named Roger Kent. We 



never knew our class play meant so much 
to her. 

After the show I went over to Times 
Square to buy a copy of the Daily Hamp- 
shire Gazette. There was a big write-up on 
page one about the graduation of the class 
of 1968 at Williamsburg. I was amazed to 
find that the principal of "Burgy" High was 
now Betty Brooks. Then I remembered 
Betty was planning to teach kindergarten 
when she was in high school, and I thought 
to myself how well she had done. From 
force of habit I read over the Classified 
Ads and this one caught my eye: "Wanted: 
small cottage on Lake Moosehead with ga- 
rage, by couple with child and cat, both 
well mannered. Cottage needed immediately. 
We can arrive in two days, with child and 
cat, four days. Call Haydenville 4302." I 
pulled out my little green book and looked 
up the number and I was startled to see 
that the ad was by Shirley Payne. 

I was very much pleased to see how all 
my classmates had made out since gradua- 
tion. They were in all walks of life now 
and scattered all over the world. I wondered 
where everyone would be in another twenty 
one years, but actually there is no way 
to tell about the future. 



Prophecy on the Prophet 



On a beautiful May day in 1962, I was 
reclining on the porch of my adobe hacienda 
located about twenty miles south of the 
town of Tombstone, Arizona. Hearing some- 
one on the steps leading to the porch, I 
quickly opened my eyes and observed a man 
about my own age, well browned by the 
sun. On closer observation I saw he was 
carrying a brief case. 

Arising from my chair, I shook his hand 
and told him to be seated. The instant he 
sat down, he opened the brief case on which 
was inscribed a T3. "Dresz" was all I could 
utter at the sight of that. 

Before I could ask him what he was 
selling he had already started his sales talk, 
and his tongue was moving like a trip- 
hammer. Occasionally I could make out a 
phrase or two, and finally came to the con- 



clusion he was selling insurance for the 
Limited Life Insurance Corporation. After 
a half hour of verbal agony, he finally 
stopped long enough so I could calmly tell 
him I was in need of no insurance at the 
present time. Seeing that he was getting 
nowhere fast, he began repacking his pa- 
pers. 

A conversation followed this, which in- 
cluded the telling of tales, and the remem- 
brance of old times. He told me he had 
been successful but had lost his money in 
a poor investment in a Chicago night-club. 
He also told me that he married a girl 
who had been a model in New York, and 
now was the proud father of four children. 
Since he was so successful in the insurance 
business, doing a job that required little 



14 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



effort, he refused the position I offered him 
in my newly acquired Canadian uranium 
mine. 

By then it was dinner time, so we feasted, 
having egg omelet and corn pone. After 
this. Dresz, who incidentally had sold me 



a policy during our chat, bid me farewell 
and left in a cloud of dust, churned by his 
1928 Ford. As I watched him disappear 
down the trail, I could not help wondering 
if our paths would cross again in the 
future. 



Class Will 



We, the class of 1947 of Williamsburg 
High School, Williamsburg, Massachusetts, 
being of unsound mind and body, do hereby 
proclaim the following to be our last will 
and testament. Any references, similarities, 
or resemblances to persons living or dead 
are purely intentional, foreseen, and pre- 
meditated by us, the testators. 

To the faculty we wish to express our 
sincere gratitude for their never tiring pati- 
ence which they certainly needed, and we 
hope they don't think their time was 
wasted. 

To Mr. Merritt we leave a new 1947 
Kaiser-Frazer automobile to chauffeur de- 
baters on their trips. 

To Mr. Foster we leave a female secre- 
tary to correct and return all our test 
papers. 

To Mr. Hill we leave a whole year's 
supply of Kleenex to save the wear and 
tear of washing and pressing handkerchiefs. 

To Mrs. Grinnell we leave a leash to tie 
around the necks of the seniors so she 
can keep track of them. 

To Miss Dunphy we leave the question 
of what really happened on our class trip. 
It seems that plenty of rumors were flying 
but of course they could or could not be 
true. 

To Miss Webber we leave bars for all the 
windows in her room. We feel this will 
cause less gray hairs as to the frights 
students give her while leaning out the 
windows to see the various ball games that 
occur. 

To Mrs. Rolland we leave a cash register 
to take care of the numerous school funds 
that we entrust to her care. 



To Marilyn Williams, Barbara Dymerski 
leaves her quiet and charming ways. 

To Joe Myrtel, Bob Smith leaves his hand- 
some looks and his "woof woof" ways. He 
hopes that Joe will get as far as he did 
with these assets. 

"Honey" Harlow leaves her voicebox to 
anyone who can talk as much as she can. 

To "Bub" Tiley, Floyd Merritt leaves his 
violin lessons. Floyd feels "Bub" can use 
them seeing he has to stay in a few nights 
now. 

Doris Graves leaves her turned up nose 
and turned down hose to Anna Mae Sin- 
cage. She thinks that Anna Mae could use 
a little sophistication. 

Rowena Nye leaves her job at the Maples 
to anyone who can work as fast as she can. 

Shirley Payne leaves a bottle of red hair 
rinse to anyone who wishes to have red 
hair. She thinks this will work although she 
never has had to use it. 

Janet Hillenbrand leaves the school to 
all the upcoming sophomores and juniors. 
She only hopes they attend it as often as 
she has which is at least three times a 
week. 

Betty Brooks leaves Mr. Hill in amaze- 
ment. She also leaves her seats in English 
and Speech to anyone who dares to take 
them. 

To Pete Bates, Frank Collins sadly leaves 
his gay selection of bright colored ties. 
Frankie says he hates to see them go; but 
to a fine fellow like Pete those ties will get 
him places. 

To Bob Hillenbrand, David LeDuc leaves 
his luck in flipping coins. David hopes Bob 
can come to school with fifty cents and end 
up going home with a couple of dollars. 



THE TATTLER 



15 



Dorothy Carver wills her obvious and 
respective way with men to Ruth Wells. 

Florence Beals leaves her farmerette am- 
bition to Virginia Dodge. She hopes Virgy 
can milk a cow every morning before com- 
ing to school as she has in the past years. 

Harriett Ice leaves her gab session in 
Consumer's Science class to Lucy Barnas. 
Harriett hopes Lucy will keep ud the inter- 
esting topic of men which is always being 
discussed. 



The senior class leaves — too bad — God 
Bless Them!! 

Executed on this nineteenth day of June, 
in the year of our Lord, one thousand nine 
hundred and forty-seven in witness whereof 
we have hereunto subscribed our names. 
Witnessed by: 

The "Burgy" Bullet 
Packard's Soda Shoppe 
The One and Only Kilroy 

JANET HILLENBRAND '47 



Class History 



Once upon a time there was a small 
village called Williamsburg which lay at 
the bottom of a very, very high mountain. 
This mountain was named Petticoat Moun- 
tain. At its foot, tucked away among the 
maple trees, was a large brick castle called 
a "school" which the superstitious villag- 
ers said was haunted. For this reason none 
of them would allow their children to go 
near it. 

Because of the housing shortage, five 
ghosts went to live at the haunted castle 
and they renamed it "Burgy" High. 

For many years the ghosts lived happily 
at "Burgy" High Castle, but one day they 
became very sad. They were lonesome. They 
wanted some company. So on a dark night 
about the 8th of September, 1943, they went 
down into the village and ran off with 
thirty-four of the children. 

Now we children thought it was great fun 
to go to the castle because we had never 
been in it before, but when we learned that 
we were not going back home again, we 
cried bitterly. 

One of the ghosts herded us down a dark 
clammy hall to a large room at the other 
end called Room VI. He said, "All right, 
now," and immediately everyone was quiet. 
The ghost continued speaking. "Your first 
torture here is called Freshmen's Reception. 
If you live through it, you are welcome to 
stay forever." 

Grimly we marked off each day until 
finally the awaited day had come! Very 
sadly and weakly we performed horrible-arf 



antics much to our upper-classmen's delight. 
When we had finished, they very kindly 
carried us out. 

It was only a short time later that we 
lealized our first year at "Burgy" High 
Castle had passed. 

In September 1944 we entered our sec- 
ond year at the castle and moved to the 
other end of the hall to Room IV. This was 
our big year, the year in which we could 
enjoy Freshmen's Reception, could teach 
the new group of freshmen to throw erasers 
and spitballs, pass notes, hang out the 
windows and sweep the floor in Room VI 
after school. 

This year some of our classmates played 
baseball and basketball, some went out for 
debating, and others played in the orchestra. 
Two new ghosts came to live at "Burgy" 
H ; gh Castle to replace the two others who 
couldn't stand it any longer. 

The most outstanding thing we learned 
in our sophomore year was how to get away 
with a minimum of study and a maximum 
of fun! 

September 1945 rolled around and to our 
surprise we found that in the large "castle 
break" fifteen of our class had escaped. 
This gave the remaining twenty of us a 
wonderful idea! Why couldn't we have a 
Valentine's Card Party and a Junior Prom 
to earn enough money to escape from the 
castle? And that is exactly what we did. 
But in June we found we did not have 
quite enough money so we decided to wait 
until the next year. 



16 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Before we knew it, it was September 1946 
and only fourteen of us had lived through 
the tortures of the past year. 

We hadn't forgotten about the plan of 
escape during the summer, either. At nine 
o'clock we eagerly ran down into the dun- 
geon to see if our money was still there. 
Carefully we removed the large stone in 
the wall and yes, there it was, almost 
one hundred dollars. 

When the money was safely hidden again, 
we went back upstairs to Room I and 
made plans for more money-making proj- 
ects. We decided on a dance, an amateur 
show and a three-act play, "Don't Darken 
My Door!" 

By March we had enough money to es- 
cape and the morning of the third, fourteen 
suitcases bound for New York were quietly 
carried out of the castle. 

That afternoon we arrived in New York 
and imagine our surprise to see mobs of 
people, cars, and tall buildings after being 
imprisoned for almost four years! 

For four days we happily roamed the 



streets, saw the stage-play "Oklahoma," 
Radio City, the Statue of Liberty, Empire 
State Building, and many other interesting 
things. But one afternoon when we were 
resting in our rooms, there came a knock 
on the door. Who should walk in but one 
of the ghosts and her husband! "At last I 
have found you," she said. "You must come 
back to "Burgy" High Castle with me at 
once!" Reluctantly we went. What else 
could we do? 

Upon our return to Burgy High Castle, 
the ghosts went into conference to decide 
upon a fitting punishment for us. To our 
great surprise, our punishment according 
to the head ghost was to be put out of the 
castle on the night of June 19, 1947. 

In two days we will be leaving dear old 
"Burgy" High Castle. We hope that we have 
kept the ghosts from becoming lonesome 
in the four years that we have lived here 
if nothing else. May they all live happily 
ever after. They deserve it! 

SHIRLEY PAYNE '47 



Song and Movie Hits 

Miss Webber "Years and Years Ago" 

Driving Class "Guilty" 

Graduation "Heartaches" 

Class of 1950 "Sooner or Later" 

Mr. Foster and his Chevy . . . "Rickety Rickshaw Man" 

Burgy High "Road to Utopia" 

Chemistry Class "The Beginning or the End" 

Seniors "The Best Years of Our Lives" 

David LeDuc "The Outlaw" 

English Classes "All Through the Day" 

Janet Hillenbrand . . . "There's gonna be a Great Day" 
Mr. Hill "For Whom the Bells Toll" 



THETATTLER 17 



Class Grinds 



Before we go there must be a verse 
About each student in "our" universe. 
It may be a dig and it may be a flatter 
But most you'll find are of the latter. 

Barbara Dymerski is my very first victim, 
She wows the boys and does she send 'em 
Right out of her house and into the street, 
"And stay out," she yells, "I'll wait for the fleet." 

Is she tall? Like a tower. 

Is she sweet? Like a flower. 

Is she silent? Like a wooded lane. 

Who can she be? Why Shirley Payne. 

Out of Goshen comes Florence Beals, 

She's a farmer's daughter and loves the fields. 

She's quiet, musical and to everyone is kind 

So if you're looking for a pal, she's the one to find. 

Harriett Ice is the most cheerful lass 
Ever claimed by this famous Senior Class, 
She's happy and gay, never known to frown, 
And there's hardly a thing that can get her down. 

There's never a dull moment when Janet Hillenbrand's near 
With some corny joke that might bring a sneer. 
At some witty remark she bursts into laughter, 
So heav'n help the guy that gets her hereafter. 

A perk, little red-head is Doris Graves 

And a good, jolly time is just what she craves. 

She'll furnish the car if he will the dough 

Then a drop of gas, a gaze at his cash, and off they'll go. 

From the highest peak we can still see that smile, 
And hear that gay laughter if we listen a while; 
This makes Betty Brooks so greatly outstanding, 
So if you ever fall, we'll supply a soft landing. 

Dorothy Carver is a typical New Englander 
Who ignores the fellows who try to land her. 
So if a wolf howls, she'll just pass him by 
With a disgusted look and an eyebrow raised high. 

When David LeDuc came out of the hills 
His pockets were loaded with five dollar bills. 
Among the New Yorkers he was quite the lad, 
But when he reached home, his wallet looked sad. 

We hear in the distance a familiar refrain, 
Could that be Honey Harlow talking again? 
Nevertheless she's a good sociable gal 
And has always been a wonderful pal. 



18 WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 

Floyd Merritt will be the next on my list. 
He's quiet, gentle, and never shakes a fist; 
He's timid, shy and green as the grass; 
Say, am I kidding? He's the wolf of our class. 

Ah yes! Lest we forget that handsome sheik 
Who swoons the girls, and makes them grow weak, 
He's Bob Smith of course, and I'll quote again 
If there's a girl around, he's sure to remain. 

A terrible smell comes again from laboratory; 
It must be Frank Collins trying to reach glory. 
His many creations flow out like H20. 
And so like water, many places he's sure to go. 

At last we come to Rowena Nye as you can see is "me." 
My only wish is to be happy wherever I may be. 
So through the many years that are to come 
I propose a toast of luck to each and everyone. 

So here ends the famous class of '47 
Who hardly expect to ever see heaven. 
Although we may reach our highest levels, 
Time will tell, but haven't we been devils? 

ROWENA I. NYE 



Class Statistics 

Most likely to succeed . . Floyd Merritt 
Most pleasing personality . Shirley Payne 
Most sophisticated .... Doris Graves 

Class Sheik . Bob Smith 

Class Vamp ... . Janet Hillenbrand 

Class Musician Floyd Merritt 

Class Singer .... Barbara Dymerski 

Class Orator Floyd Merritt 

Class Wit Frank Collins 

Noisiest Student David LeDuc 

Quietest Student .... Florence Beals 
Smartest Student .... Floyd Merritt 
Jolliest Student . . . Janet Hillenbrand 
Best All-Round Student . Shirley Payne 
Class Gossip .... Theodora Harlow 

Class Actress Betty Brooks 

Class Actor Frank Collins 



THE TATTLER 



19 



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20 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Class of 1948 




First Row: Shirley Shumway. Palma Ingellis, Viola Fraser. Barbara Outhuse. Marilyn 

Williams. 
Second Row: Ruth Wells, Mae Sanderson. Connie Baj. Shirley Nichols. 

Third Row: Robert Collins, Laura Lloyd, Joseph Myrtel, Virginia Dodge, Russell 
Warner. 



CLASS OFFICERS 



PRESIDENT— Viola Fraser 
SECRETARY— Palma Ingellis 



VICE PRESIDENT— Marilyn Williams 
TREASURER— Barbara Outhuse 



HISTORIAN— Shirley Shumway 



JUNIOR CLASS 



We go to Williamsburg High School. 
Our home room number is II. 
Our home room teacher is Miss Webber, 
She's always pulled us through. 

Some of us take Geometry. 

Others of us take French. 

But one thing in common known by all 

Is three years (so far) well spent. 



THE TATTLER 



21 



Class of 1950 




First Row : Lily Mathers, Theresa LaCourse, Nancy Dunphy, Jeannette Baldwin, 

Dorothy Golash, Lorraine Richardson, Doris Shumway. 
Second Row: Arlene Sears, Esther Loomis, Joyce Hurley. 
Third Row: Gerald Tennyson, Mary Srcczek, Ruth Merritt, Ann LeDuc, Irene Ferron, 

Eva LaFleur. 
Fourth Row: Raymond Morin, Edward McColgan, Warren McAvoy, Robert Durbin, 

Frank Vaillancourt, Roy Baldwin. 

CLASS OFFICERS 
PRESIDENT— Esther Loomis VICE PRESIDENT— Raymond Morin 

SECRETARY— Doris Shumway TREASURER— Theresa LaCourse 

HISTORIAN— Dorothy Golash 



THE SOPHOMORES OF WILLIAMSBURG HIGH 



We are the sophomores of "Burgy" High, 
Faithful to our class come do or die, 
In the classroom, out of doors, 
We are united evermore. 



Teachers who know, those who are wise, 

See honor and happiness in our eyes; 

Now we open our doors to the next sophomore class 

And remembering- us, through these doors may they pass. 



22 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Class of 1950 




First Row: Henry Warner, Irene Roberge, Shirley Magdalenski, Marion Johnson, 

Mary. Wells, Joyce Morin, Anna Mae Sincage, Alice Curtis, Lvcy Barnas, Philp Morin 
Second Row: Robert Hillenbrand, Elaine Outhuse, Joyce Colson, Anne Sabo, Reta 

Ice, Alice Barker, William Curtis. 
Third Row: Earl Richardson, Herbert Nye, Robert Liimatainen, Robert McCord, 

Donald Baldwin. 
Fourth Row: Harvey Cranston, Henry Bisbee, Dorrance Bates, John Brisbois, Charles 

Mollison, Arthur Clary, Robert Sharpe. 
Fifth Row: John Maggs, Charles Warner, Norman Brisbois, Percy Culver, Allen Warner. 

CLASS OFFICERS 
PRESIDENT— Anne Sabo VICE PRESIDENT— Dorrance Bates 

SECRETARY— Charles Mollison TREASURER— Norman Bates 

HISTORIAN— Reta Ice 



FRESHMAN CLASS 

The Freshmen are a problem 

I '.'cause they won't be good, 

Because they aren't grown up enough, 

Nor act the way they should. 

But they're really very good at heart, 

And trying hard to please; 

They try so hard to do their part. 

And learn to stand at ease. 

And even haughty seniors 

Admit they never rue 

The day that they look back upon 

When they were Freshmen, too. 



THE TATTLER 



23 



Editorials 



LAUNCHED BUT NOT ANCHORED 

As fourteen ships for the first time glide 
over the water and out to sea, there are 
varying expressions on the faces of the 
throng gathered at the port. Fond, proud 
hearts ask the question, "How will the 
trip go?" Here are fourteen new ships each 
launched upon a life with so many pos- 
sible anchorages. What type of voyage 
will they undertake ? Will they succeed ? 

While we have certain common charac- 
teristics, each has different tastes, feelings, 
and aims. Yet, we are the better for four 
years of working together. Upon gradua- 
tion our common desire for adventure will 
launch us on all types of voyages. Whether 
these trips will be successful will depend 
not only upon the storms at sea but upon 
our own courage, stamina, and tenacity of 
spirit. Some of us will make a short 
voyage and soon come to anchor while 
others will never permanently rest in port. 

Regardless of these variances, we have 
certain common beliefs and ideals. We ap- 
preciate our heritage as citizens of the 
United States. We have the advantage of 
being able to see our ancestors' mistakes 
and hope to profit from them. With trust 
in God, we will work to make our country 
a better place for everyone. And before we 
anchor our ships, I know that a great step 
in bringing about world peace and brother- 
hood will have been made. The very fact 
that we have gained a high school educa- 
t ; on indicates success in our voyages and 
our lives. 

May we each complete an honorable voy- 
age before anchoring our ships with the 
satisfaction of a life well spent. 

FLOYD S. MERRITT '47 



GRADUATION NIGHT— THE 
BEGINNING OR THE END 

In one way, June 19, 1947 marks the 
beginning for us; in another way, it marks 
the end. It all depends on the way we look 
at it. 

I say that it marks the beginning for us. 
It does, in the sense that many of us will 



just begin to realize that we can't depend 
on others to pull us through all our lives. 
We will realize that we are growing up 
and that grown up people usually have to 
look after themselves. They have to find 
jobs for themselves, earn their own liv- 
ings, choose their own ways of living. A 
good percentage of us undoubtedly will 
enter college, and it might take a little 
time to conform to living away from home 
and studying much harder. 

Graduation night may also mark the 
ending. To some it may mean the end of 
high-school drudgery, the end of cramming 
for exams. On the other hand it may 
mean the end of the best years of our 
lives, the end of working just enough to 
get by, the end of happy, fun-packed days. 

Whatever way we may feel about grad- 
uation night now, I am reasonably sure 
that in a few years we all will be able to 
see clearly and to appreciate the different 
meanings that graduation night can hold 
for us. 

BARBARA DYMERSKI '47 



EQUAL OPPORTUNITITES? 

"All men are created equal." "Liberty 
and justice for all." "Do unto others as you 
would have them do unto you." These are 
very familiar sayings to us Americans, but 
to many, they mean absolutely nothing. 

In America, we brag that everyone has 
equal opportunities. But America is about 
the poorest example of equal opportunities 
in the world. 

When we say that all men are created 
equal, why do we mean all except the 
American Negro? When we say "Liberty 
and justice for all", why doesn't this mean 
the Negro too? He's as much of an Amer- 
ican as we are. When we quote the Golden 
Rule, do we really mean it? Would you 
want the Negro to do to you what you have 
done to him? Naturally, you wouldn't. Then 
why don't you do unto him that which you 
would want him to do unto you? 

If a Negro family lived next to you, you 
would play with the children and have a 



24 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



good time regardless of race religion, or 
nationality. Or at least you would until 
you heard your parents or other older 
people talking against them. 

Race prejudice begins in the homes; 
and to beat it. we have to start there. We 
have to teach this generation and prove to 
them that Negroes are equal to whites. 
Then, perhaps the next generation will not 
feel so superior. Perhaps they will not be 
so un-American. 

Why can't we give Negroes better jobs 
so they will earn more money and move 
from the slums? Why don't we associate 
more with the Negroes and help them to 
feel at home in their own country? Why 
don't more of us follow the Golden Rule? 
It is because we have all that we want and 



we care nothing about anyone else. We are 
a selfish, unthoughtful group of people. 

If you were ill, how would you feel if a 
Negro donated blood so that you could live ? 
How would you feel if a Negro doctor saved 
your life? You'd be very grateful, wouldn't 
you? You'd feel differently about them. 
Well, does something like that have to 
happen before you will help the Negroes 
gain equal rights? Can't you help them 
first? 

If more of us were humanitarians, per- 
haps there would be fewer race riots, less 
race prejudice. Perhaps all men would 
really be created equal. Until that time, 
let's hope that the next generation will get 
"color blind." 

SHIRLEY PAYNE '47 



Opinions of New York City 



I obtained two main impressions of New- 
York during the short time we were there. 
Everything is very entertaining and some- 
what of a circus to sightseers but the spirit 
seems to be as cold and impersonal as the 
giant skyscrapers. Both the beauty and the 
excitement are superficial. 

FLOYD MERRITT 

As I stood in the observatory in the 
Empire State Building one hundred and two 
stories above the street. I couldn't help but 
think of the vast expanse of woodland that 
this building would cover if it were built 
one story high. The city of New York is 
all right for those who want to go to 
shows and have a good time but I'll take 
the country life any day. 

DAVID LED1 

As I got off the train in New York, I 
thought what a terrible place it was. It 
was nothing like good old "Burgy" with its 
clean fresh air. After getting settled at 
the hotel and starting to see the high spots. 
I changed my opinion and decided that it 
was really beautiful, fascinating, and very 
thrilling. 

HONEY HARLOW 



New York is a large city, but it is quite 
easy to find your way around. The build- 
ings and narrow streets are not quite like 
the impression I had of them from post 
cards. They are huge, interesting, and im- 
pressing. 

FLORENCE BEALS 

I thoroughly enjoyed New York from 
the time I arrived until the final farewell. 
The trip definitely came up to all of my 
expectations. If ever I have the chance, I 
would be most interested and delighted to 
make a return tr'p to that city. 

ELIZABETH BROOKS 

I wasn't too awed by the sights of New- 
York. It is just like any other city on a 
much vaster scale. I think what impressed 
me most was the Radio City Music Hall. 
A vacation there is fun, but the real vaca- 
tion is when you get back to quiet life. 

DOROTHY CARVER 

In New York a person can do practcally 
anything he wants at any time and I do 
think that New York is the most wonderful 
spot in the world. 

JANET HILLENBRAND 



THE TATTLER 



25 



New York is a nice place to visit but I 
wouldn't like to live there all my life. It's 
too noisy, crowded, and rushed. It was quite 
an experience to be at the top of the world's 
largest structure. I think that New York 
is fine for Broadway stars and night-club 
people, but not for me. 

BARBARA DYMERSKI 

I was impressed by New York's vast ex- 
panse and intricate subway system. I was 
disappointed by the shabby appearance of 
some areas and the perpetual rush of people 
and taxi cabs. I was surprised by the ease 
with which you can find your way around. 
I was amazed with the size of the Statue of 
Liberty and the beauty and perfection of 
Radio City. I was sceptical of the traffic 
system, especially those dashing taxis. I 
was pleased with New York and I found 
that everything was interesting. 

FRANK COLLINS 

Upon arriving in New York I was very 
disappointed. It is too crowded and windy. 
If you don't run down the streets, you get 
pushed, and above all if you expect to live, 
you must try to dodge the taxis. I enjoyed 
the boat ride to and from the Statue of 
Liberty more than words can express. I 



would like to go back to New York and 
really get acquainted with the place. 

HARRIETT ICE 

I think what amazed me most in New 
York was the way the taxis bounded around 
the streets. They looked very much like 
battered racing cars and if they didn't get 
you on the street, they were sure to get you 
on the sidewalks! 

SHIRLEY PAYNE 

In my own opinion of New York, there 
could be no better place to live than in the 
heart of Times Square or Fifth Avenue. 
The thrill of subways, skyscrapers and the 
rush of many cabs was a new and exciting 
experience. The splendid architecture of the 
buildings in comparison to buildings I have 
commonly seen, is of supreme difference. I 
think New York is the most fascinating 
place with which I have ever come in con- 
tact. 

ROWENA NYE 

New York City to me was something new 
and fascinating. I was naturally impressed 
with the mobs of people all intent on going 
their own way and the ever popular lights 
of Times Square. It was an immense let- 
down to return to Williamsburg. 

DORIS GRAVES 



26 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Literary 



AMERICA'S CONTRIBUTION TO A 
PERMANENT PEACE* 

Out of the evil shadows of darkness and 
gloom shines a still, small star beckoning 
the weary traveler. As he staggers on, this 
pin-point of light glows steadily brighter, 
crowding out the dense hovering clouds, 
illuminating a carved ivory gate, labeled 
"Peace." Inside the gate the traveler 
straightens his dx-ooping shoulders in sud- 
den awe as he beholds a bank of pure white 
clouds mounting higher and higher, shin- 
ing brighter and brighter, surmounted by 
that same star radiating over all the land 
below. Here is a land of fertile fields and 
quiet hamlets, a land of free people working 
in harmony and sharing each other's joys 
and fears. This is a land of peace dedicated 
to man and God. 

Such is the vision in the minds of most 
of us today. It is not a new vision but 
merely an intensified desire strengthened 
by a need greater than ever before for the 
salvation of humanity. This vision is as old 
as More's Utopia. It is older, as old as man. 
Today we believe, as did the ancients, that 
this effervescent star is for the first time in 
sight. Whether correct in this prediction I 
cannot say. 

It is certainly evident that America has 
set a precedent in peace-making policies. 
International arbitration has always been 
supported by the United States. We can 
point to countless other obvious contribu- 
tions to a permanent peace. The Pan Amer- 
ican Union of the Western Hem' sphere and 
our unfortified Canadian border are two 
examples. Our participation in a World 
Court and numerous world organizations 



such as the present United Nations are 
others. 

Yet the real contributions of America to 
a lasting peace lie not in organizations or 
foreign policies but in principles and ideals. 
Most of them are impossible to describe. 
For how can one describe freedom, inde- 
pendence, or belief in God ? I can point out 
our freedom of speech, freedom of worship, 
freedom of the press, but unless you are an 
American, you will not know the feeling of 
contentment and independence they breed. 
Unless you have seen the Statue of Liberty 
guarding this land in solitary glory, unless 
you have seen that fragment of striped 
Stardust rippling in a quiet breeze and the 
trust in the upturned faces, unless you feel 
the spirit of trust in God, the pride and 
the duty of these citizens, you can never 
comprehend the trre contributions America 
has made to a lasting peace. Our greatest 
gift is democracy. 

It is the simple respect of the rights and 
privileges of others which will best promote 
world understanding. More than anything 
else the practice of equality of mankind can 
heal our wounds. A complete peace may be 
impossible in our lifetime; but in democ- 
racy, world government, and God we have 
the fundamental tools with which to build 
a permanent peace. 

FLOYD S. MERRITT '47 

* Chosen as the winning essay by the American 
Legion tAuxiliarv among seventeen school entries 

in Unit 5V*o. 2, consisting of Hampshire and 
Franklin Counties in the National Americanism 
Essay Contest. 



WHAT'S YOUR GOAL? 
What's your goal in life? If you are like 
most people, it is to get the most you can 
with a scant amount of work and effort 
involved. To some people this seems only 
logical. It is a shame that the members 
of this group are of the majority. The 
other group, the minority, are those who 
want the most life has to offer, but who 
will work hard and long to get it. This 



latter group are also the ones who will 
stop along life's way to bring help and 
cheer to those less unfortunate than they, 
unfortunate, perhaps, because they were of 
that majority group. Are you of the ma- 
jority ? Don't be afraid to change. If 
enough others do, someday the minority will 
be the majority. 

BARBARA OUTHUSE '48 



THE TATTLER 



27 



WORLD OF BLACKNESS 

The girl who stood at the curb of the 
main street of the small Georgian town was 
attractive and well-poised. She looked like 
any other high school girl in dungarees 
except that the dark glasses that she wore 
and the bitter lines around her mouth gave 
her a rather dramatic look. 

A beautiful collie dog pulled impetuously 
at the leash she held in her hand. The dog 
wasn't used to indecision on the part of 
his mistress. In truth, his mistress had no 
idea where she wanted to go. The streets 
were quiet in this strange town in the 
middle of the afternoon. Finally an almost 
indiscernible touch told the collie that she 
wanted to cross the street. This was accom- 
plished with little interruption since the 
small town seemed to doze under the effects 
of the hot summer afternoon and almost 
no one else was on the street. 

The girl lifted her foot up from the curb; 
but it slid from the edge, and she tripped 
and fell. Almost instantly a gentle hand 
was on her elbow and someone was helping 
her up. 

"Are you all right?" a soft Southern 
voice was drawling. 

The girl was on her feet now. 

"Yes, thank you ever so much. My name 
is Nan Grayson. I'm from Maine, but I'm 
here in Georgia visiting my aunt. I suppose 
it was rather clumsy of me to slip on that 
curb, but thanks again for helping me up. 
I've been ill so I don't go out very often. 
I suppose that's the reason. Wouldn't you 
like to walk home with me and have a cold 
drink or something so that I can show my 
gratitude?" 

"Oh ." The hesitation on the part of 

the stranger was obvious and the silence 
was suddenly oppressively ominous. Then 
she spoke again. I think I'd better not, 
even though I'd like to." 

Nan spoke, "Then you could at least tell 
me your name and perhaps change your 
mind, you know." 

"My name is Lola Atkins; I really would 
like to know you better, but !" 

"Then come on." 

Lola fell into step with Nan with a queer 
reluctance. 



That was the beginning of a great 
friendship between the two girls. As Nan 
had said before, she spent a good deal of 
her time inside; but they met on the porch 
for delightful afternoons of chatter. 

Everything sailed along smoothly until 
Nan introduced Lola to her aunt. There 
was a stiff silence and then her aunt gave 
her a lecture on choosing the right type 
of friends. Then other incidents began to 
spring to Nan's attention. Since she had 
walked on the streets with Lola, she had 
not made one other friend. Even the few 
people she had known before stayed away. 
And all of a sudden, Lola tried to stop 
seeing her. 

The tension between the two girls sud- 
denly snapped one day when Lola burst 
unexpectedly into the room where Nan was 
sitting alone. 

"Look, Nan, I can't come here any more. 
I knew I shouldn't have come in the first 
place. I'm making you lose all your friends 
that you ever had as far as this town is 
concerned. I ." 

But Nan interrupted her, "I don't get it. 
I like you very much, Lola, and we have . 
good times together. I don't see why you 
seem to think that you're making me lose 
friends, either. Why can't we keep on 
being friends?" 

Lola's face showed surprise. 

"You mean you don't know — you don't 
realize—? Can't you see? I'm colored and 
you're white; that's the difference. It just 
isn't right." She began to grow bitter. "It 
never was right and it never will be. We 
just can't be friends anymore. When you 
were so friendly that first day, I wanted to 
be, too, so I came home with you against 
my better judgment. Now I know I was 
wrong, that's all." 

If Lola's face had shown surprise, Nan's 
face did even more so. 

"So that's it," she said slowly. Then she 
sat quietly for a minute. "No, Lola, that 
doesn't make any difference; the color of 
our skins, I mean. If other people could 
only see it, too! We don't need to break 
up a friendship because of that." 

Lola spoke bitterly. "That's the trouble, 
though. Other people don't see it. I'm not 
going to see you losing friends of your 



28 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



own race just because you go around with 
me." 

Nan hesitated considerably before she 
spoke again. 

"I was hoping I wouldn't have to tell 
you, but I guess I've got to. I managed 
to keep it a secret quite well, though, don't 
you think? Don't you know why I never 
go out any more than I can help? Why I 
wear dark glasses? Why I never read? Oh, 
Lola, I liked you by instinct! I didn't know 
you were colored, and even now that I do, 
it doesn't make any difference. Don't you 
see, Lola? Your being black doesn't make 
any difference to me." Her voice grew soft. 
"It doesn't matter a bit because I live in 
a world of blackness anyway. You see, Lola, 
I'm blind." 

ANNE SABO '50 

THE SUN OF MAN 

I could rest now. The day's work was 
done and I could rest and watch the sun 
ease his blazing head below the sombre 
skyline. The sky and the day shared their 
glorious end in one great display of beauty. 
A pink, delicate, innocent-looking cloud wit- 
nessed the silent spectacle from high above. 

It had seen much of the lives of man 
today and much unforgettable woe. Yet, 
as the cloud would scatter before the winds, 
would not man's miseries likewise dissipate ? 
The sun himself was now a thing of much 
greater beauty than in mid-day. His noon- 
time torch was tempered now and the radi- 
ance was shared by half the sky, creating 
a splendor that was awesome and pleas- 
ant to the eye. Yet, in his time, does not 
man himself blaze to brilliance, then fade 
and lose his efforts with mankind's? Does 
man's blinding but foolish extreme moder- 
ate to usefulness? 

The blood-red disc was sinking very low. 
Like the spirit of a grand old man, he cast 
rich, massive shades of glory through the 
heavens. Spent, yet lingering with a last 
glowing memory of his day's journey, he 
settled from sight. Again the sky grew 
richer with a stately hush as though in 



salute to defeat. Are man's defeats so glori- 
ous and impressive? Can man create such 
a spell of splendor at his time of departure? 

FRANK B. COLLINS '47 



RUSSIA TODAY 

On every side we hear the cries about 
predominating Russia. Yet are all the 
stories true? You realize how a story may 
be told and how different it is after a dozen 
people have heard it. Could this not be the 
same situation between the Russian and 
American people? 

One of the main issues between Russia 
and the United States is the free press. 
It is this that led to other differences. We 
are attempting to abolish what is known 
as "The Iron Curtain." In other words, we 
don't want the plan that Russia now has, 
whereby no news is printed or let out of the 
country without first receiving Stalin's ap- 
proval. We classify this as being dictatorial. 

It is no wonder that we disagree with 
Russia. How can two people understand 
each other when they don't have the same 
basic principles ? For example, there are 
now two different interpretations of the 
word "Democracy." One is Russian; the 
other, American. In 1864 Lincoln saw the 
need for one meaning of the word "Liberty." 
I think we have the same need with the 
word "Democracy." 

In a recent edition of "Look" many points 
are brought forth about what the Russians 
think of us. If it were not for our pride, 
we might realize how truthful some of the 
illustrations are. They say at one time that 
the American people were being constantly 
fooled by propaganda. A novel, "The Amer- 
ican," is an example of the latter, I be- 
lieve. It does not come out and tell false- 
hoods, but it leaves incorrect impressions. 

I believe if everyone would think twice 
before he spoke that there would be less 
misunderstanding the world over, not only 
in the homes, but also in the ruling bodies 
of the countries. 

VIOLA FRASER '48 



THE TATTLER 



29 



YOUR LIFE AND MY LIFE 
Man is like a weed when 

one stops to consider; 
He grows till he reaches his peak, 

and then begins to wither. 
No one is excluded from this law 

of nature, and everyone knows 
That he will return from whence 

he came as do the petals of the rose. 

Life has its moments of happiness, 

gaiety, and sadness, too, 
.A.nd when our name is reached on the list, 

we're sometimes glad we're through. 
So it will be down the path of time, 

that man must follow until 
His name is called, and he responds 

to that, which is God's will. 

ROBERT SMITH '47 



DEATH COMES SOFTLY CREEPING 

Death comes softly creeping 

And with gentle hand. 
It leads the young and aged 

To that wondrous heavenly land. 

It makes no difference if you've sinned 

Of if you're poor and old. 
Our God will always welcome more 

Into His heavenly fold. 
Life is like a bed of roses 

And to everyone 'tis known, 
The best are always picked the first 

In heaven's streets to roam. 
So when our Father calls your name, 

And the pearly gates swing wide, — 
Don't fear, dear friend, for very soon 

We'll all be at your side. 

SHIRLEY PAYNE '47 



THINKING 

I am supposed to write 

about anything, dull or bright. 
But I cannot compose 

anything in verse or prose. 
I've thought of many different things 

from school books to diamond rings. 
I have tried and tried to think 

of all the colors from brown to pink. 
I've thought of birds, flowers and bees, of 

fluffy white clouds and tall green trees. 
Of all these subjects I cannot choose 

which one of them I'd like to use. 
To think of a poem I've tried and tried, I just 

can't compose on the interesting side- 
Oh! What's the use, I'll wait till the morrow. 

HARRIETT ICE '47 

DEAR CONSOLING FRIEND 
Dear consoling friend 
I will not part with thee 
No matter what the toll, 
For you're a part of me. 
In tears and joy I turn 
To you, my friend, and know 
That you will always give 
To me your warmth and glow. 
I shall not listen to those 
Who say I shall regret 
The hours I spend with thee, 
My favorite cigarette. 

RUSSELL WARNER '48 



LIFE ON A FRONTIER HOME 

They traveled through forests dark and 

deep, 
Through places which would make you and 

me creep, 
And after going through swamps and bogs, 
They wielded their axes and cut some logs. 
With these they made houses, crude and 

rough, 
Bad as they were, they were good enough. 

Inside the cabin was the big fireplace. 
All across one end it took up the space. 
Above the fireplace, on the wall, 
Hung the rifle, protector of all. 
The floor was dirt; the walls were bare; 
Still they were happy, free from care. 

With a field in front, the woods in back, 
Meat and corn they never did lack. 
Although the father had no horse to ride, 
He had his trusty rifle, his dog by his side. 
And into the forest he would go, 
To come back later with a full grown doe. 

While he worked in his little plot, 
His wife prepared a simmering pot. 
And when his work was thoroughly done, 
He'd come to the dinner that he had won. 

ROBERT COLLINS '48 



:{0 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Tattler Staff 




First Row: Laura Lloyd, Palma Ingellis, Esther Loomis, Shirley Payne, Barbara 

Dymerski, Marilyn Williams. 
Second Row: Floyd Merritt, Mr. Hill, Frank Collins, Robert Smith, Russell Warner, 

Edward McColgan, Robert Collins. 



THE TATTLER 

The Tattler is our year book. 

It's printed every year, 
By the members of the high school 

While the faculty stands near. 

In the front part of the year book 

Is the graduating class; 
The very finest pictures 

Of every lad and lass. 

But the other classes you will find 
In groups so well portraying 

The way they look each school day bright, 
Their private hopes betraying. 



Of course we'll find our debating team 

Of whom we are so proud, 
Their fame we would like to shout 

In voices high and loud. 

Then, too, we find the orchestra. 

It's not too large you'll see; 
And then the staff of the Revue, 

A magazine for you and me. 

Not to forget the staff of this 
Whose hard and patient work 

Has made this book just 

What it is. No one his duty'll shirk. 

SHIRLEY NICHOLS '48 



THE TATTLER 



31 



Revue Staff 




First Row: Laura Lloyd, Shirley Payne, Theresa LaCourse, Viola Fraser, Barbara 

Dymerski. 
Second Row: Shirley Magdalenski, Rowena Nye, Palma Ingellis, Irene Ferron, 

Marilyn Williams. 
Third Row: Doris Graves, Betty Brooks, Barbara Outhuse. 
Fourth Row: Edward McColgan, Frank Collins, Ruth Wells, Ann LeDuc. 



REVUE 

Editor-in-Chief Viola J. Fraser 

Assistant Editor Barbara Dymerski 

Artist Palma Ingellis 

Assistant Shirley Magdalenski 

Sports Editor Edward McColgan 

Feature Editor Shirley Payne 

Alumni Editor Dorothy Carver 

Campus Capers Marilyn Williams 

Assistant Irene Ferron 



Exchange Editor Betty Brooks 

Fashions Doris Graves 

News Editor Barbara Outhuse 

Typists Rowena Nye, Ruth Wells, 

Shirley Payne 

Book and Movie Review Betty Brooks 

Circulation Department Frank Collins, 

Laura Lloyd, Theresa LaCourse, 

Shirley Magdalenski 

Faculty Advisor Mrs. Grinnell 



We started the year with a new faculty 
advisor, Mrs. Grinnell. We have greatly 
appreciated her cheerful help in all ways. 

Eight issues of The Revue have been pub- 
lished this year, without too much change 
in its working order. The most outstanding 
addition was the comic strip in the latter 
part of the year. The plan of developing 



pictures for the paper has been carried out 
to some extent. 

We of the staff hope that even more in- 
terest will be taken in the editing and sub- 
scribing of the paper in the future and a 
greater number of students will work to- 
ward its development. 



32 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Forensic League 




First Row: Miss Webber, Floyd Merritt, Shirley Magdalenski, Barbara Outhuse, 
Mar.lyn Williams, Donald Baldwin. 

Second Row: Elaine Outhuse, Allen Warner, Shirley Nichols, Mary Sroczek, Anne 

Sabo, Doris Graves. 



NATIONAL FORENSIC LEAGUE 

Quite a few turned out for debating this 
year and had their first chance to practice 
at a tournament held in Westfield. Later in 
the year four debaters attended a Junior 
Model Congress at Chicopee and four at- 
tended another Congress at A. I. C. Our 
debaters have been called on to debate for 
various clubs and also for an assembly. 
During the year a practice debate was held 
with St. Michael's of Northampton to test 
our system against theirs. 

This year the first teams consisted of 
Anne Sabo and Barbara Outhuse for the 
negative and Floyd Merritt and Marilyn 



Williams for the affirmative. The results 
were as follows: 



South Hadley 

Northampton 

Amherst 

Westfield 

Hopkins 



South Hadley 

Northampton 

Amherst 

Westfield 

Hopkins 



Affirmative 

2 Williamsburg 
1 Williamsburg 
1 Williamsburg 

Williamsburg 

1 Wililamsburg 

Negative 

3 Williamsburg 

2 Williamsburg 

1 Williamsburg 
Williamsburg 

2 Williamsburg 



1 
2 
2 
3 
2 




1 

3 
1 



THE TATTLER 



33 



Pro Merito 




Left to Right: Floyd Merritt, Barbara Dymerski, Dorothy Carver, Doris Graves, 
Shirley Nichols, Barbara Outhuse, Marilyn Williams. 



PRO MERITO SOCIETY 



Of the five junior members of the Pro 
Merito Society only four remained and 
were announced by Miss Dunphy in October 
as senior members. They were Dorothy 
Carver, Barbara Dymerski, Doris Graves 
and Floyd Merritt. Also in October four 
new members, June Demerski, Shirley 
Nichols, Barbara Outhuse and Marilyn Wil- 
liams were announced as the junior mem- 
bers. Now, at the close of school there 
are seven members of the National Pro 
Merito Society here at Williamsburg' High 
School for the year 1947. 



34 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Basketball Team 




First Row: Philip Morin, Edward McColgan, Russell Warner, Raymond Morin, Joseph 
Myrtel. 

Second Row: Robert Hillenbrand, Mr. Kistner, Gerald Tennyson, Harvey Cranston. 



BASKETBALL 

With the engagement last fall of Charles 
Kistner as athletic director, a real basket- 
ball team was started. Lack of a full time 
leader in the last few years has seriously 
hindered the boys. To the few veteran 
players was added a large group of fresh- 
men and sophomore players. These boys 
had to jump into the games scheduled by 
the Franklin League with little practice or 
experience. However, they have by this 
time developed in skill so as to guarantee a 
team our school will be proud of next year. 

Although the total scores reveal, numeri- 
cally, only two victories, a far greater score 
was made in the field of good sportsman- 
ship. If no victories were announced, this 
display of sportsmanship would impel ad- 
miration from this school and others. 



THE TATTLER 



35 



Cheer Leaders 



■BMejj^^H 




First Row: Janet Hillenbrand, Rowena Nye, Theodora Harlow. 
Second Row: Reta Ice, Anna-Mae Sincage, Joyce Morin, Shirley Magdalenski. 



BASKETBALL 


SCORES 




Chester 


44 


Williamsburg 


29 


Alumni 


39 


Williamsburg 


29 


Chester 


48 


Williamsburg 


21 


Powers 


46 


Williamsburg 


21 


Clarke 


57 


Williamsburg 


30 


Sanderson 


42 


Williamsburg 


21 


Huntington 


53 


Williamsburg 


33 


Powers 


40 


Williamsburg 


16 


Huntington 


70 


Williamsburg 


24 


Charlemont 


15 


Williamsburg 


21 


Sanderson 


43 


Williamsburg 


34 



36 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Baseball Team 



^M 




> 



First Row: Earle Richardson, Donald Baldwin, Raymond Morin, Robert Hillenbrand, 

Philip Morin. 
Second Row : Mr. Kistner, Russell Warner, Percy Culver, Allen Warner, Edward 

McGolgan, Henry Warner, Charles Warner. 



For the first time in several years the 
boys at Williamsburg High School have 
been able to form a baseball team. This is 
due in part to the ava'lability of a good 
coach, but mostly to the desire of the boys 
to really do something about what has been 
a dormant ambition. It is too early in the 
season to predict our final rating as a high 
school baseball team. However, the first 
games have been played successfully as is 
seen by the scores available at the time 
THE TATTLER goes to press. 



Clarke School 


:} 




Williamsburg 


6 


Charlemont 


7 




Williamsburg 


10 


Clarke School 


3 


(10) 


Williamsburg 


3 


Charlemont 


8 




Williamsburg 


16 


Clarke School 


8" 




Williamsburg 


1 1 


Sanderson 


8 




Williamsburg 






THE TATTLER 



37 



Glee Clubs 



U 1 4 % 




First Row: Robert Liimatainen, Herbert Nye, Donald Baldwin, Raymond Morin. 
S^ond Row: Allen Warner, Frank Collins, Robert Smith, John Maggs, Floyd Merritt, 
Henry Bisbee, Edward McColgan, David LeDuc. 




First Row: Irene Ferron, Laura Lloyd, Viola Fraser, Marion Johnson, Joyce Morin, 
Anna-Mae Sincage, Shirley Magdalenski, Esther Loomis, Florence Beals. 

Second Row: Betty Brooks, Reta Ice, Anne Sabo, Nancy Dunphy, Joyce Hurley, Shirley 
Shumway, Harriet Ice, Irene Roberge, Theodora Harlow. 



38 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Senior Class Play 




Left to Rierht: David LeDuc, Floyd Merritt, Betty Brooks, Frank Collins, Florence 

Beals, Shirley Payne, Barbara Dymerski. 
Seated: Dorothy Carver. 



To finance a class trip to New York the 
class decided to concentrate on one major 
activity, a play. Accordingly, work was 
begun in December on "Don't Darken My 
Door," a three act comedy, by Anne Coulter 
Martens. We engaged Leo F. Parent, pro- 
fessional director, to instruct us, and we 
drew the characters from the ranks of the 
class. 

Following a matinee and two evening per- 
formances in the Williamsburg Town Hall. 
we traveled to Cummington and Chesterfield 



to repeat the presentation. The audiences 
were especially pleased with the humorous 
antics of the maid, Betty Brooks, and the 
hired boy, Frank Collins. Others in the 
cast were Dorothy Carver, Floyd Merritt, 
Barbara Dymei-ski, David Leduc, Shirley 
Payne and Florence Beals. 

The enjoyment we obtained from working 
together on the play and from the class tr.'p 
which resulted makes us look back with 
pleasure, and hope that this may set a 
precedent for other classes. 



Informals 




11 

Identification Next Page 



IDENTIFICATION 

1. David LeDuc, Theodora Harlow, Robert 
Smith, Frank Collins. 

2. Mrs. Grinnell. 

3. Floyd Merritt, Janet Hillenbrand. 

4. Senior Class. 

5. Robert Smith, Frank Collins. 

6. David LeDuc, Robert Smith, Frank 
Collins. 

7. Senior Class. 

8. Robert Smith, Frank Collins, Janet Hil- 
lenbrand. 

9. Mr. Warner. 

10. David LeDuc, Robert Smith. 

11. Robert Smith, Janet Hillenbrand, Theo- 
dora Harlow, Harriett Ice. 

12. Florence Beals, Shirley Payne. 



THE TATTLER 



39 



Junior Prom 





40 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Informals 




Identification page 41 



THE TATTLER 



41 



Alumni Notes 



ALUMNI OFFICERS 

D. Clary Snow President 

Shirley Meisse Vice President 

Jean Hemenway Secretary 

Eleanor Ballway Treasurer 

Executive Committee 

Evelyn Kmit, Roy Leonard, Frank Soltys, 
Marion Sylvester, Norma Wells 



CLASS OF '46 

Ruth Elnor Bowker— McCallum's Store, 
Northampton. 

Hattie Marion Clark — Commercial Col- 
lege, Northampton. 

Suzanne Crone — Shelburne Falls. 

Robert Patrick Dana — U. S. Navy. 

Richard Herbert Daniels — Bisbee's Saw 
Mill, Chesterfield. 

Alice Ann Golash — Pro-phy-lac-tic Brush 
Co., Florence. 

Shirley Mae Hathaway — Grant's Paper 
Co., Leeds. 



Elizabeth Irene Kulash 
Commercial College. 



Northampton 



Russell Verdine Loomis — Mountain St., 
Haydenville. 

Helen Moore Sylvester — Cooley Dickinson 
Hospital, Northampton. 

Cora Louise Warner — Northampton Com- 
mercial College. 

Marshall Clyde Warner — U. S. Navy. 



ALUMNI BIRTHS 

Fred Allen '41 — son. 

Doris Newell Avery '39 — daughter. 

Marcia Ingellis Calabrate '40 — daughter. 

Donald Campbell '42 — son. 

Shirley C. Hathaway '40 — daughter. 

Clarice Graves Dymerski '44 — son. 

Doris Sabo Elmes '39 — daughter. 

Donna Hobbs Damon '44 — daughter. 

Albert Mosher '35 — daughter. 

Robert Otis '37— daughter. 

Ruth Carver Maxwell '44 — daughter. 

Bette Lou H. Sylvester '43 — daughter. 

Phyllis West Webb '39— daughter. 

Helen Batura Yeskie '39 — son. 

Warren Gould '39 — son. 



ALUMNI DEATHS 
Robert J. McAllister, '41. 



ALUMNI MARRIAGES 
Charlotte Algustoski '37 to Carl Sylves- 



ter. 



Elizabeth Harlow '43 to Eugene Sylvester. 
Janice Wells '39 to Marvin Banister. 
Mary Coogan '35 to John Caulifield. 
Marjorie Jacque to George Warner '39. 
Theresa Racicot to Leonard Walpole '15. 
Lillian Adams to Gilbert Loud '34. 
Joyce Giles to Adelbert Roberge '41 
Logia Jablonski '40 to Victor Jordan. 
Elizabeth Damon '43 to Fred Marsh. 
Martha Deane '44 to Ralph Townsley. 
Phyllis Rhoades '45 to Thomas Doyle. 
Roberta Colburn '38 to Richard Caldwell. 
Cecelia Soltys '42 to Richard Watling. 



Informals identification 



1. 


Betty Brooks 


5. 


Harriett Ice 


2. 


Floyd Merritt 


6. 


David LeDuc 


3. 


Senior Class Trip 


7. 


Doris Graves 


4. 


Florence Beals 


8. 


"Honey" Harlow 



42 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Autographs 



C. F. JENKINS 

Stationery — Greeting Cards — Medicines 
Ice Cream 



WILLIAMSBURG 



MASSACHUSETTS 



SOCONY SERVICE 


Compliments of 


STATION 






R. F. BURKE 


Dial 275 






WILLIAMSBURG 


WILLIAMSBURG 





Compliments of 



" G O L D I E S " 



Cummington 



Massachusetts 



HILLCREST FARM 

Mrs. Clayton Rhoades 

SINGLE COMB 
RHODE ISLAND REDS 

Bred to Win, Lay and Pay 
Williamsburp 



Compliments of 

F. N. GRAVES & SON 

Williamsburg 



Compliments of 

R. A. MacLEOD NURSERY 

LANDSCAPING and TREE SERVICE 
WILLIAMSBURG 



Telephone 211 



Old Goshen Road 



Compliments of 



A FRIEND 



Compliments of 

REARDON BROS. 

Haydenville 



Compliments of 

HICKEY'S ICE CREAM BAR 

Bridge Street Haydenville 

CIGARS, CIGARETTES, MAGAZINES 
NEWSPAPERS 

LaSALLE'S ICE CREAM 



BISBEE BROTHERS 

Get Our Prices on Anything You Need 

Tel. Williamsburg 271 and Chesterfield 2145 



Compliments of 



THE HAYDENVILLE COMPANY 



Compliments 


.1. f. McAllister 


of 


ESSO SERVICENTER 


JONES THE FLORIST 


GASOLINE MOTOR OIL 


HAYDENVILLE 


Tires, Batteries & Accessories 


Tel. 4:5:! 1 — 4:::;2 

* 


Route 9 Haydenville 


Compliments of 


PACKARD'S SODA SHOPPE 


Compliments of 


BRYANT'S RADIO & ELECTRICAL SHOP 


SALES AND SERVICE 




WILLIAMSBURG GARAGE 


WAR BONDS 






C. K. HATHAWAY 


and 






Tel. 4351 


STAMPS 






SERVICE STATION 


WILLIAMSBURG 


Ice Cream, Candy, Cigars 


POST OFFICE 


WILLIAMSBURG 



i WILLIAMSURG FUEL AND ICE COMPANY 

Coal — Oil — Ice 


Compliments of 

J. R. MANSFIELD & SON 
Funeral Home 

South Main Street 
Haydenville 


BROOKS GARAGE 

Colonial Esso Garage 

Gas — Oil — Accessories 
Electric Welding 

Route 9 Berkshire Trail 
GOSHEN, MASS. 


MARTIN A. PADDOCK 
TAILORING CO. 

FINE CUSTOM TAILORING 
For Men and Women 

4 Crafts Ave. Next to City Hall 
Tel. 308 Northampton 


PAINTS WALLPAPER 
GLASS ARTIST'S SUPPLIES 

PIERCE'S PAINT STORE 

196 Main Street 
Northampton 


Compliments of 

BON MARCHE 
MILLINERY 

BAGS — SCARFS — JEWELRY 

183 Main St. 
Northampton 


HANDICRAFT SHOP 

Graduation and Wedding Gifts 

Jewelry Handkerchiefs 

Baby Things 

Handmade Articles 

179 Main St. Northampton 

Phone 3690 



GOOD SHOES 
Reasonably Priced 

Correctly Fitted 

DAVID BOOT SHOP 

221 Main Street 
Northampton 


WM. BAKER & SON 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

Service — Courtesy 

Satisfaction 

Telephone 2341 Chesterfield 


Compliments of 
H. D. STANTON 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

West Chesterfield 
Tel. 2523 


FRED HEALY JR. 
Mason 

LIGHT CONTRACTOR 

Tel. Chesterfield 2372 


Compliments of 

B. G. HIGGINS 

Mfgr . 
POUNDED ASH BASKETS 

Chesterfield 


Compliments of 

A FRIEND 


Compliments of 

W. E. KELLOGG AND SON 

DAIRY and POULTRY PRODUCTS 
Tel. 3631 Williamsburg 



© For the young man who grad- 
uates this year we have everything 
that he will need for this important 
occasion. 

MERRITT CLARK & CO. 

NORTHAMPTON 



FRANKLIN KING, JR. 

INSURANCE 



277 Main St. 



Northampton 



GO TO BRANDLES FIRST 



To Save Time and Trouble for Your 



PRESCRIPTIONS 



MAIN STREET 



NORTHAMPTON 



O. T. DEWHURST 



OPTOMETRISTS and OPTICIANS 



Our modern school systems put a lot of work upon growing eyes which puts 
a strain upon those with defective vision. Latent defects in the eyes of 
children should be carefully looked after. A little fore-sight now, may help 
them in their studies. Let us examine their eyes. 



201 MAIN ST. 



Telephone 184- W 



NORTHAMPTON 



RUBY'S 
FURNITURE STORES, INC. 

15 BRIDGE STREET 
Tel. 3519 



NORTHAMPTON 



— fc- — — 

Compliments of 

MacDONALD'S SHOE SHOP 

185 Main Street 
Northampton 


Compliments of 

KINGS PAPER & PAINT 
STORE 

157 Main Street 
NORTHAMPTON 


Compliments of 
COHEN BROS. 

Northampton 


Compliments of 

A. J. POLMATIER 


Compliments 
and 

Best Wishes to the 

Class of 1947 

JACK AUGUST 

Northampton 


Herbs and Annals 
Choice Perennials 
for 
Rock Garden and Border 
House Plants 

VILLAGE HILL NURSERY 

WILLIAMSBURG 


Compliments of 
A FRIEND 


Compliments of 
CHARLES KISTNER 

Coach of 
Athletics and Physical Education 



LUCE'S GARAGE 



Haydenville 



USED CARS — TOWING — REPAIRING 



Specializing in PONTIAC and GENERAL MOTORS 



Tel. Northampton 654-M3 — 3062-W1 



Compliments of 


Good Things To Eat 
at 


BEAVER BROOK POULTRY 


BECKMANN'S 


FARM 


NORTHAMPTON 


LEEDS, MASS. 


Candy Mailed — Tasty Pastries 
Refreshing Sodas — Fine lee Cream 


Compliments of 




THE CLARY FARM 




— Try — 


Compliments of 


OUR MAPLE SYRUP 




For Farm and Village Property 


A FRIEND 


Consult SILAS SNOW 




Telephone 3563 Williamsburg 













Compliments of 








NORTHAMPTON STREET 


RAILWAY 


COMPANY 


MOTOR 


COACH SERVICE 






• 


* 








EDWARD A. 


PELLISSIER, 






Vice-President and General Manager 











A. SOLTYS 

MEATS — GROCERIES 
VEGETABLES 

Telephone 223 
Haydenville 


BEEBE'S LUNCH 

* 
A Good Place to Eat 

Ice Cream and Beverages 

* 

Berkshire Trail 

A. T. BEEBE, Prop. 
Haydenville 


Athletic Supplies 

PURSEGLOVE'S 

15 State Street 
Northampton 


WARD MILLER 

Westinghouse & Norge Refrigerators 

Oil Burners and Service 

-Home Insulation 

14 Center St. Phone 2123-R 
NORTHAMPTON 


CE RRUTI'S 

JEWELERS— ENGRAVERS 
WATCHMAKERS 

Northampton 


MAYFLOWER RESTAURANT 

44 PLEASANT ST. 

"The Best Food Served Daily" 

Dinner Specials— 11 A.M. to 2 P.M. 
Supper Specials— 5 P.M. to 12 M. 

Tel. 3263 



Compliments of 

the following members of the 

FLORENCE CIVIC AND BUSINESS ASSOCIATES 



ALEXANDER'S MARKET 

AUTOMOTIVE AND HOME SUPPLIES 

BERNARD PLATING WORKS 

WILLIAM A. BERNACHE 

BREGUET'S FILLING STATION 

CALLAHAN'S 5-10-25c-$1.00 

CARL'S APPAREL STORE 

CHAS. H. DUNNING AND SON 

ED'S DINER 

ELAINE'S BEAUTY SHOP 

ANN ELLIOT 

EVERYBODY'S MARKET 

FICKERT AND FINCH 

FLORENCE AUTO CLINIC 

GAGNON'S SPORTING GOODS 

FLORENCE INN 

HANNIGAN-LeMAR CO. 

LaMONTAGNE'S 

LONGTIN'S 

MEISSE'S MUSIC STORE 

MURPHY'S MERCHANDISE MART 

TREMBLAY DRUG CO. 

VARIETY MARKET 



Compliments of 



ERIC STAHLBERG, M. P. 



CAMERA PORTRAITS 



Northampton, Mass. 





HARLOW'S 


Compliments of 


LUGGAGE REPAIRS 




BILL FOLDS TOILET KITS 


GUSETTTS 


EXPERT LOCKSMITH 



HAYDENVILLE 



18 Center St., Northampton 
Telephone 155-W 



CHILSON'S SHOP 

W. LEROY CHILSON 
Awnings — Venetian Blinds 
Furniture Coverings and Upholstering Supplies 
Furniture Upholstering Automobile Plate & Safety Glass 

Window Shades Auto Tops and Upholstery- 

Slip Covers, Cushions Truck Covers and Canvas Goods 

34 CENTER STREET, NORTHAMPTON 



Compliments of — 

C. 0. CARLSON 


Compliments of — 

CLASS OF '48 


MANHAN 
POTATO CHIP CO. INC. 

NORMA LEE CANDIES 

92 Kins St. 
Tel. 771 Northampton 


WILLIAMSBURG 
GENERAL STORE 

26 Main St. Tel. 294 

Williamsburg 

Meats — Groceries — Hardware 
Paints and General Merchandise 

FREE DELIVERY 


Compliments of — 

CANDLE LIGHT 
DEN 


Congratulations and Continual 
Success in the future. This is 
the wish of the leading men's 
and boys' wear store of Hamp- 
shire County. 

HARRY DANIELS ASSOC. 

NORTHAMPTON 


E. J. GARE & SON 

JEWELERS DIAMONDS 
WATCHES SILVERWARE 

112 Main Street Northampton 



ELGIN 

BULOVA 

LONGINES 



HAMILTON 

MOVADO 

OMEGO 



WATCHES 



WOOD & STRAND 



Jewelers 



Northampton 



Herman A. Cohn 



Phone 1426 



THE FAIR STORE 

Women's, Men's 

and 

Children's Wear 

Shoes 

27-29 Pleasant St. Northampton 



You May Always Depend Upon The Quality 
of Flowers Which Come From 




FLOWERS 



HEADQUARTERS 

FOR EVERYTHING 

ELECTRIC 

Sales and Service 

Nothing Too Small or Too Large All Work Done by Experts 

WE REPAIR ALL RADIOS AND ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES 




ajpwjs 



ELECTRIC SHOP 



C28 ENTER STREET PHONE 1307 

Northampton, Mass. 



28 Center St. 



ELECTRICAL CONTRACTING 



Phone 1307 



PLEASANT TIME SHOP 



WATCHES 



RINGS 



DIAMONDS 



EXPERT WATCH REPAIRING 



83 Pleasant Street 



Northampton 



Compliments of 


Compliments of 


CLASS OF '50 


CLASS OF '49 




For the BEST in 


Compliments of 


Col Provia Driveways 




RUSSELL V. LOOMIS 


A FRIEND 


Haydenville 




Call Williamsburg 4558 



LATEST 
MODEL 
USED 
CARS 



BUICK Authorized Sales & Service 
JOHN C. STRUBBE 

Telephone Northampton 456 

Complete Motor Analysis 
and Tune Up 

NORTHAMPTON BUICK CO. 



BODY 

AND 

FENDER 

WORK 





































































*£ 4( fa m ■